Experimental fusion reactor: US Department to announce “major scientific breakthrough” in nuclear fusion

Science Experimental fusion reactor

US Department wants to announce “significant scientific breakthrough” in nuclear fusion

A look at the so-called preamplifiers of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.  They amplify the laser light that is aimed at the hydrogen

The so-called preamplifiers of the National Ignition Facility of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. They amplify the laser light that is aimed at the hydrogen

Source: Damien Jemison/LLNL

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For the first time, researchers are said to have succeeded in generating more energy from a nuclear fusion than the process requires. The US Department of Energy announced a statement for Tuesday. It would be a significant step towards a fossil-free and clean energy source.

WScientists at a US laboratory have apparently made important progress in nuclear fusion research. US Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm will announce “a significant scientific breakthrough” on Tuesday, the US Department of Energy and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California announced on Sunday (local time).

Several media outlets had previously reported that scientists at LLNL had succeeded in using an experimental fusion reactor for the first time to generate more energy than was consumed during the process.

A net energy gain of 120 percent was achieved, the British reported “Financial Times” on Sunday, citing three people involved in the trials. Also the “Washington Post” reported on the alleged breakthrough, quoting a fusion scientist as saying, “For most of us, it was only a matter of time.”

Researchers at the LLNL reported one a year ago Net energy gain of 70 percent and thus a huge step forward.

More about nuclear fusion

Natural nuclear fusion: The sun gives off light and heat

The US Department of Energy and the lab initially declined to confirm the reports because the “analysis is still ongoing.” However, they announced a statement from the minister for Tuesday.

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In nuclear fusion, atomic nuclei are fused together at extreme temperatures. Enormous amounts of energy are released in the process. Conventional nuclear power plants generate energy from the fission of atomic nuclei.

In order to bring about nuclear fusion, a considerable amount of energy is required. Nuclear fusion, according to its supporters, could eventually become an alternative to burning fossil fuels and controversial nuclear fission. Although since the 50s dozens of experimental reactors were built, no plant had ever succeeded in generating more energy than was required for the process.

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