EU: Around 240,000 premature deaths from fine dust pollution per year

Science According to the Environment Agency

Around 240,000 premature deaths in the EU due to particulate matter pollution

You can listen to our WELT podcasts here

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is required, since the providers of the embedded content as third-party providers require this consent [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (which can be revoked at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can withdraw your consent at any time via the switch and via privacy at the bottom of the page.

Bad air is deadly: In the EU, a number of people are still dying prematurely because they are exposed to fine dust. City dwellers are particularly at risk. But there is also good news.

TDespite better air quality, around 240,000 people in the EU died prematurely in 2020 as a result of exposure to particulate matter in the air around them. The EU Environment Agency EEA published this estimate on Thursday. People who live in cities are therefore particularly at risk: almost all city dwellers (96 percent) are exposed to fine dust levels that are above the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline values ​​of five micrograms per cubic meter, it said.

See also  WELT live +++ Concern about Russian attack on hydroelectric power station in Nowa Kachowka - video

Although air quality in EU countries has improved in recent years, air pollutants are still the greatest environmental health threat. They are one of the main reasons for premature death and illness. Heart disease and stroke are the most common related causes of death, followed by lung cancer and other lung diseases.

According to the Environment Agency, 49,000 deaths were due to chronic exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and 24,000 to exposure to ground-level ozone (O3).

also read

According to estimates, around 28,900 premature deaths in Germany in 2020 can be attributed to the pollution of the ambient air with fine dust. The Environment Agency gave values ​​of 10,000 and 4,600 for pollution with nitrogen dioxide and ground-level ozone.

also read

Brand Story MARINE RESEARCH

advertisement

But there is also good news: Between 2005 and 2020, the number of premature deaths due to particulate matter pollution in the EU fell by 45 percent, according to the EEA analysis. If this trend continues, the EU could probably achieve its goal of reducing the number by 55 percent by 2030. The EU Commission had set the target as part of its so-called European Green Deal.

also read

In winter, the risk of smog is highest in Germany - here plumes of smoke over Wolfratshausen in Bavaria

“Nevertheless, further efforts are needed to achieve the vision of zero pollution by 2050 – that is, reducing air pollution to levels that are no longer considered harmful to health,” said the EU agency’s report.

In 2020, measures related to the corona pandemic in many countries would have had an impact on pollutant emissions and led to improved air quality. “Nitrogen dioxide concentrations have temporarily decreased – a direct result of reduced road traffic during the Covid lockdowns,” the EEA reported.

You can listen to our WELT podcasts here

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is required, since the providers of the embedded content as third-party providers require this consent [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (which can be revoked at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can withdraw your consent at any time via the switch and via privacy at the bottom of the page.

“Aha! Ten minutes of everyday knowledge” is WELT’s knowledge podcast. Every Tuesday and Thursday we answer everyday questions from the field of science. Subscribe to the podcast at Spotify, Apple Podcasts, deezer, Amazon Music or directly via RSS feed.

See more here

See also  UN calls for radical change in global economy

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *