Cicadas in the US: “Kill them! Kick ’em, beat ’em to death… just get rid of ’em”


Science Cicadas in the USA

“Kill her! Kick ’em, beat ’em to death… just get rid of ’em”

ARCHIVE - 09/20/2022, USA, ---: Vince Burkle, Compliance Officer for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, holds an adult Spotted Lanternhopper Planter found in Huntington.  In the north-east of the USA, many places are currently teeming with red-speckled insects, even on the skyscrapers of Manhattan there are masses of spotted lantern-bearers.  (to dpa " ARCHIVE - 09/20/2022, USA, ---: Vince Burkle, Compliance Officer for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, holds an adult Spotted Lanternhopper Planter found in Huntington.  In the north-east of the USA, many places are currently teeming with red-speckled insects, even on the skyscrapers of Manhattan there are masses of spotted lantern-bearers.  (to dpa "

Born in the USA: An adult Spotted Lanternhopper

Source: dpa

The lantern bearer cicada, which immigrated to the USA years ago, is now becoming a plague. Insects are multiplying rapidly in the north-east of the USA. They suck up plants. The authorities are calling for mass killings – preferably immediately.

SThe spotted lantern bearer cicada has even made it to “Saturday Night Live”. “People tell their kids to crush me,” complained comedian Bowen Yang, disguised as the insect, on the US comedy show. “I’m just trying to live my life, find a partner and have 3,000 to 4,000 babies.” The comedy about the current insect plague in the Northeast of the United States has a serious background.

The animal with the scientific name “Lycorma delicatula” seems omnipresent in the region – in the media, in conversations between friends and acquaintances, but above all in the environment – from forests, meadows, parks and fields to the metropolis of New York. According to scientists at Pennsylvania State University, the insects seem to feel particularly at home there on the sun-warmed outer walls of the high-rise buildings made of glass and concrete.

Spotted Lanternfly bug with vibrant red wings feeding on pond water in Chester County, Pennsylvania.

The cicadas, which are about two centimeters in size, are “a danger to many fruit plants and trees,” it says

Source: Getty Images

The Spotted Lantern Bearer Planthopper originally comes from Southeast Asia and China. Its adult wings are partly conspicuously black and partly bright red. In 2014 she became first sighted in Pennsylvania – but only this year the animals spread extensively in 14 states and became a real plague. They don’t seem to have made it to Europe yet.

The fully grown insects, which are around two centimeters long, are harmless to humans, but they can cause great damage in nature and agriculture. They pierce through leaves and stems, suck out the plants and have already caused millions of dollars in damage.

also read

14.10.2018., Zagreb, Croatia - Halyomorpha halys, The brown marbled stink bug is considered an invasive species, or a pest of foreign origin, as it was introduced to the United States from Eastern Asia in the mid-1990s.  It is also referred to as the yellow-brown or East Asian stink bug.  The bug was first collected in the United States in Allentown.  It quickly spread east to New Jersey, then Virginia by 2004, and now southward to the North Carolina border.  Today, brown marbled stink bugs are most prevalent in the mid-Atlanta region, but they have been identified in 44 states and the District of Columbia.  The bug's native range includes China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan.  Photo: Patrik Macek/PIXSELL

“The spotted planthopper is a threat to many fruit plants and trees,” according to the US Department of Agriculture. “If we allow it to spread across the US, this plague could seriously damage wine, fruit and lumber production.”

To combat the insects, which tend to hop rather than fly, the responsible authorities in many US states have launched an unusual appeal to the population: please step on them! “Kill her! Kick ’em, beat ’em to death…just get rid of ’em,” says the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, for example. Also the Administration of Central Park in New York asks visitors to step on the animals – and countless people do so. The park and many sidewalks in the metropolis are full of trampled people in some places cicadas.

also read

Following several days of warm weather, cicadas are making their presence felt in New York City.  The insects, emerge by the millions every 17 years to mate and reproduce, only to then begin another cycle.  Billions of cicadas are expected to emerge up and down the East Coast of the US this summer.  Photo by Dennis Van Tine / ABACAUSA.COM

For some people, killing Lanternhopper Planthoppers has become something of a hobby, and they proudly report their successes. There is even an app called “Squishr” where you can compete with other players. Other people generally do not want to kill animals, even if they are potentially harmful insects.

The “Dilemma of the Spotted Lantern Bearer Cicada” is what the “New York Magazine” calls it: “Tread or not tread?”

With the onset of frost, the insects will gradually disappear from the cityscape of the metropolis of New York and the affected states in the coming weeks – but they have already laid their eggs and they can survive the winter. Young animals can hatch in the spring. Then experts fear, above all, a further spread towards the west of the USA – for example in the wine-growing regions of California.

also read

Protection against mosquitoes and ticks is becoming increasingly important

Scientists know that footsteps alone won’t solve the problem – but there aren’t many other options just yet, mainly because the insect damages so many different plants and lays its numerous eggs in so many different places.

“If we don’t stop it, it will spread,” Pennsylvania State University researcher Julie Urban told CNN. “Long-term research-based solutions are on the way. But we need help buying time.”

You can listen to our WELT podcasts here

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is required, since the providers of the embedded content as third-party providers require this consent [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (which can be revoked at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can withdraw your consent at any time via the switch and via privacy at the bottom of the page.

“Aha! Ten minutes of everyday knowledge” is WELT’s knowledge podcast. Every Tuesday and Thursday we answer everyday questions from the field of science. Subscribe to the podcast at Spotify, Apple Podcasts, deezer, Amazon Music or directly via RSS feed.



Source link

See also  How to protect animals from siren noise

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *