Marine Ecology

Cone snail’s strike is one of the quickest in the animal kingdom

With the use of ultra-high-speed videography, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Associate Professor Emanuel Azizi and colleagues from Occidental College Los Angeles have shed light on the hunting mechanism of the cone snail Conus catus. Published online in Current Biology — Cell Press, the researchers identified the snail’s hydraulically propelled feeding structure as the quickest movement…

Protecting the Tasman Bay is crucial for ocean health, says the man taking on a kaitiaki role
Marine Ecology

Protecting the Tasman Bay is crucial for ocean health, says the man taking on a kaitiaki role

Braden FastierThe spotted shag can dive to depths of 40 metres.On a winter’s day last year, Stew Robertson saw a right whale scratching an itch in the shallows of Onetahuti Beach in Abel Tasman National Park. “It looked like a log, being rolled by the waves. But the water was calm, and when I got closer, I saw it was a whale, scratching its back on the sand.”Braden FastierOur ocean’s health hangs in the balance, with over fishing and sediment build…

First ‘Extreme Corals’ at Great Barrier Reef Mangrove Lagoons Discovered, Could Be ‘Hot Spots’ of Resilience
Marine Ecology

First ‘Extreme Corals’ at Great Barrier Reef Mangrove Lagoons Discovered, Could Be ‘Hot Spots’ of Resilience

Researchers say they have identified “extreme corals” for the first time in mangrove lagoons around Australia’s Great Barrier Reef—a discovery that has implications for reef conservation and challenges our understanding of the conditions corals can tolerate.A team of scientists, led by Emma Camp from the University of Technology Sydney in Australia, found 34 species of…

Whale sightings in NYC increase
Marine Ecology

Whale sightings in NYC increase

It might sound like a good thing that the number of whale sightings have increased around New York City and northern New Jersey, but it’s actually a huge safety concern for both the animals and humans. The result of warmer and cleaner waters in the area, the population of Atlantic menhaden, humpback whales’ major food…

Marine Ecology

Sunscreens release metals and nutrients into seawater

Beachgoers are becoming increasingly aware of the potentially harmful effects UV filters from sunscreens can have on coral and other marine organisms when the protective lotions wash off their bodies into the ocean. Now, researchers have studied how sunscreens release different compounds — trace metals and inorganic nutrients — into Mediterranean seawater, with unknown effects…