Marine Ecology

China’s ocean waste surges 27% in 2018: ministry

BEIJING/SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China dumped a total of 200.7 million cubic meters of waste into its coastal waters in 2018, a 27% rise on the previous year and the highest level in at least a decade, the country’s environment ministry said on Tuesday. FILE PHOTO: Workers clear garbage at the bank of Yangtze River in…

For sea creatures, baseline shows disease as sentinel of change

As global warming increases disease, healthy corals, pictured here, are at greater risk for ecological impacts. Credit: Drew Harvell/Cornell University The health of Earth’s oceans is rapidly worsening, and newly published Cornell-led research has examined changes in reported diseases across undersea species at a global scale over a 44-year period. The findings, published Oct. 9…

Total immersion: re-imagining the ocean

Illustration by Antoine Dore Neptune’s Laboratory: Fantasy, Fear, and Science at Sea Antony Adler Harvard University Press (2019)Reef Life: An underwater memoir Callum Roberts Profile (2019)On a calm day, the ocean can resemble a vast mirror. Peering over the side of a boat, we might see ourselves reflected; what lies beneath is hidden.In Neptune’s Laboratory,…

U.N. confirms the ocean is screwed

The ocean isn’t alright. The seas, which hold some 332,519,000 cubic miles of water, are warming, rising, acidifying, and losing oxygen. And a new comprehensive U.N. climate special report, released Wednesday, presents an encyclopedic review of how Earth’s oceans and ice sheets have been altered as the world relentlessly warms.  Over 100 scientists from 36…

New deep-water coral discovered

Pax, Latin for ‘peace’ made its way into the scientific name of a new coral discovered off Pacific Panama and described in the journal Bulletin of Marine Science. According to researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia at the University of Costa Rica (CIMAR)…

How do you weigh a massive whale?

Dead whales, stranded and decaying on beaches, can sometimes be weighed. But weighing a live whale is nearly impossible. Until now.  Marine scientists have developed an innovative way to accurately estimate the heft of free-living whales by using drones to capture aerial footage of cetacean bodies. Scientists published the research Wednesday in the journal Methods…