Marine Ecology

MBL team images the bacterial hitchhikers on plastic trash in ocean

The structure of microbial communities colonizing microplastics collected from the North Atlantic Ocean (Vineyard Sound, Woods Hole, Mass.) This image reveals the phylogenetic affiliations of different bacterial groups. Large ellipsoid and pennate yellow cells= diatoms; long filamentous cell across center = cyanobacteria; blue= general bacteria; yellow rods = Bacteroidetes; red = Alphaproteobacteria; cyan= Rhodobacteraceae. Scale…

Animals could help humans monitor oceans

Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. Thousands of marine animals are tagged for a variety of research and conservation purposes, but at present the information gathered isn’t widely used to track climate change and other shifts in the oceans. Instead, monitoring…

Shark proof wetsuit material could help save lives

A new wetsuit material tested by Flinders marine researchers with Great White sharks at Neptune Islands. Credit: Associate Professor Charlie Huveneers, Flinders University A new wet suit material tested by Flinders marine researchers can help reduce blood loss caused by shark bites, to reduce injuries and prevent the leading cause of death from shark bites.…

Scientists develop rapid cell division in marine sponges

Vertebrate, insect, and plant cell lines are important tools for research in many disciplines, including human health, evolutionary and developmental biology, agriculture and toxicology. Cell lines have been established for many organisms, including freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates. Despite many efforts over multiple decades, there are still no cell lines for marine invertebrates including marine sponges,…

New research into badger dispersal could minimize bovine tuberculosis spread

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Zoology researchers from Trinity, working with the Department of Agriculture, Food and The Marine (DAFM) and the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), have unlocked the secrets of dispersing badgers. Their research, reported today, has major implications for implementing vaccination programs to limit the spread of bovine tuberculosis (TB). The findings…

Shark proof wetsuit material could help save lives

A new wetsuit material tested by Flinders marine researchers with Great White sharks at Neptune Islands. Credit: Associate Professor Charlie Huveneers, Flinders University A new wet suit material tested by Flinders marine researchers can help reduce blood loss caused by shark bites, to reduce injuries and prevent the leading cause of death from shark bites.…

How giant kelp may respond to climate change

Jose Luis Kappes prepares to enter a dense Chilean kelp bed to collect reproductive fronds. Credit: Jordan Hollarsmith/UC Davis When a marine heat wave hit California’s coast in 2014, it brought ocean temperatures that were high for Northern California but fairly normal for a Southern California summer. Much of the giant kelp in the north…

Parasite manipulates algal metabolism for its own benefit

Healthy (left) and infected (right) diatom Coscinodiscus granii: In the cell on the right, the parasitic oomycete Lagenisma coscinodisci has sucked all nutrients and modulated the algal metabolome to generate its own reproductive form, the sporangium. Credit: Marine Vallet, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Microalgae can form massive assemblages in oceans, attracting many opportunistic…