New chlamydia species discovered deep under the Arctic Ocean
Nature & Science

New chlamydia species discovered deep under the Arctic Ocean

(CNN)When people hear the word chlamydia, they usually think about sexually transmitted infections.And it’s true that the specific bacteria that causes chlamydia typically depend on interactions with other organisms to survive. So when a team of researchers discovered several new chlamydia-related species deep below the Arctic Ocean, in a place with no oxygen and without…

Turning Water into Watts
Renewable Energy

Turning Water into Watts

Taken from the March 2020 issue of Physics World. Members of the Institute of Physics can enjoy the full issue via the Physics World app. Huge technical and financial hurdles face anyone seeking to harness the vast power of the world’s oceans. For a devout band of researchers and hi-tech business pioneers, however, the dream…

Microbiological and Nutritional Analysis of Lettuce Crops Grown on the International Space Station
Environmental News

Microbiological and Nutritional Analysis of Lettuce Crops Grown on the International Space Station

Introduction Crop production in space may be a necessary and desirable component of future exploration systems (MacElroy et al., 1992; Kliss et al., 2000). Fresh produce can be grown in situ to supplement a stored, packaged diet, and crops may provide beneficial nutrients as well as dietary variety. Veggie is a small plant growth chamber…

Carbon emissions fall at fastest rate in 30 years as electricity sector moves away from coal
Renewable Energy

Carbon emissions fall at fastest rate in 30 years as electricity sector moves away from coal

Carbon emissions generated by the electricity sector fell at the fastest rate in at least 30 years as countries turned their backs on coal, analysis suggests. Coal-fuelled electricity declined 3 per cent in 2019, leading to a 2 per cent fall in the power sector’s carbon dioxide emissions, according to a worldwide assessment by climate think tank Ember.…