The art of upcycling
Nature News

The art of upcycling

“It used to be that things were built the best they could be to last as long as possible,” says Jonathan Ward, co-founder and CEO of ICON. Not anymore. Since 1990, global car production has doubled, outpacing population growth, and cars are built with shorter lifecycles, meaning that they’ll land in junkyards faster than in…

Every time the small cabbage white butterfly flaps its wings it has us to thank
Nature & Science

Every time the small cabbage white butterfly flaps its wings it has us to thank

The geographic range and genetic diversity of the small cabbage white butterfly is detailed in a new study co-authored by Sean Ryan, formerly of the UT Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology within the UT Institute of Agriculture. Ryan worked under the supervision of DeWayne Shoemaker, professor and head of the UT Department of Entomology…

The Pitter Patter of Tiny Neanderthal Feet Echo Across Time as Footprints Found in France
Nature & Science

The Pitter Patter of Tiny Neanderthal Feet Echo Across Time as Footprints Found in France

They walked and perhaps played along the beach in a prehistoric world; we know this as archaeologists have discovered hundreds of Neanderthal footprints in France— with most of them left by children. By following their footsteps, are we discovering that Neanderthals were more like modern humans than previously thought? Have we been underestimating our ancient…

See 14 animals that have shown us their impressive smarts
Nature News

See 14 animals that have shown us their impressive smarts

Scientific research constantly gives glimpses into new dimensions of animal cognition. But intelligence—which is so complex and encompasses such a wide range of adaptive abilities—remains confoundingly tricky to measure. “One of the biggest challenges is our inability to comprehend how other species process information,” says Kristina Horback, an assistant professor in the Department of Animal…